Posts Tagged Herbs

Herbs For Natural Drug Detox

via: TrutherGirls
by: August 2, 2012

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Super human strength created by superfoods and herbs

via: NaturalNews
Thursday, August 02, 2012
by: Jonathan Landsman

[NaturalNews] Imagine living life without (chronic) unwarranted fear and never having to experience degenerative disease. This is NOT just a silly idea – it’s reality for many people throughout the world. Epidemiological studies prove that the longest living (happy) people remain connected to the earth and thrive on whole, natural foods – filled with nutrients but low in calories.

Experience the life of your dreams! Eating spirulina, chlorella, goji berries, chaga mushrooms and ashwagandha can balance blood sugars, boost the immune system and help detoxify unwanted poisons from the body. Don’t miss the next NaturalNews Talk Hour for one of the most informative and inspirational (nutritional) programs of the year!

What’s the difference between spirulina and chlorella?

While both are considered “micro-algaes” – spirulina and chlorella are not the same. But, without getting too caught up in the details, both of these superfoods can out perform just about any other food on earth. When consumed on a daily basis – these foods have tremendous healing potential.

Spirulina is very high in vitamin B12, B-complex, iron, essential trace minerals, beta-carotene and gamma-linolenic acid. It is the richest source of natural antioxidants of any whole food and it has more concentrated vegetable nutrition than any other whole food.

Chlorella is a green single-celled micro algae that contains the highest concentrations of chlorophyll known (60 mg/serving). It has high levels of beta-carotene, vitamin B12, iron, RNA and DNA and protein. Chlorella is well-known for its ability to help remove heavy metals from the intestinal tract. Discover how these foods (plus many more) can help transform your life!

Continue Reading At: NaturalNews.com

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How to treat asthma with diet and herbs

Via: NaturalNews
Sunday, June 17, 2012
By: Sarka-Jonae Miller

[NaturalNews] Over the past three decades the number of people with asthma has increased significantly in the United States and diet may be to blame. Studies show a correlation between poor diet and asthma. People are eating more processed, unnatural foods and fewer things that are good for them. People who eat healthy nutritious foods develop asthma less often than people who eat poorly. Although few doctors acknowledge the link between asthma and diet it does exist. Certain foods and nutrients appear to be effective in the prevention and treatment for asthma. There are also asthma guidelines for foods people should avoid.

Management of asthma symptoms

Diet modifications are a reasonable option for people wondering how to treat asthma naturally. Research shows that people who large amounts of antioxidants and other nutrients including flavonoids, omega-3 fatty acids, beta-carotene, vitamin C, vitamin E, selenium and magnesium have lower rates of asthma. Antioxidants are likely a large factor in the reduced asthma rates because they neutralize harmful free radicals and thus protect cells from damage.

Studies show that children and teenagers who eat diets high in fruits and omega-3 fatty acids generally have strong lungs and few asthma-like symptoms. Conversely, people who get low amounts of nutrients such as vitamin C, vitamin E and omega-3s have high rates of poor lung function. The Mediterranean diet shows promise for the prevention and management of asthma. The Mediterranean diet promotes fruits, vegetables and nuts. These foods are high in antioxidants and vitamins.

Asthma guidelines for eating

Diet and asthma may seem like a strange correlation. Asthma has to do with constriction of the bronchial tubes that pass through the lungs, not the digestive system. Inflammation of the airways and mucus production contribute to asthma, which is why anti-inflammatory medications are a large part of conventional asthma treatment. However, foods can decrease inflammation too. Turmeric and ginger have anti-inflammatory properties.

Avoiding certain foods also plays a role in the treatment for asthma. Dairy products can increase mucus production. Andrew Weil, PhD recommends that people with asthma eliminate milk products, animal protein and fried foods from their diets. He also says to stay away from polyunsaturated vegetable oils and partially hydrogenated oils.

More asthma guidelines for diet include increasing omega-3 intake, relying on extra-virgin olive oil as a main source of fat and consuming organic fruits and vegetables daily. Apples, carrots, leafy vegetables and tomatoes have all demonstrated beneficial effects for preventing asthma in studies.

Drinking a lot of water to keep respiratory tract secretions more fluid is important too. The Mayo Clinic suggests that women in general have at least 9 cups of water daily and that men drink 13 cups.

How to treat asthma with herbs and tinctures

Butterbur root extract decreased the severity, frequency and duration of asthma attacks in a study involving 80 patients. The study took place over the course of four months and by the end, more than 40 percent of participants who were taking asthma medication were able to decrease usage.

A tincture of three parts lobelia to one part cayenne pepper mixed in water and taken at the first signs of impending asthma attacks can help stop attacks before they start.

Management of asthma and allergies

Food allergies can contribute to asthma. Discovering food triggers and then avoiding them can therefore help with the management of asthma. Sugar, soy, corn and gluten are common foods that cause allergies. Abstaining from eating these foods for eight weeks to see if symptoms improve can indicate a problem.

Source: NaturalNews.com 

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Forget health-damaging painkillers – Use proven natural remedies and herbs to treat joint pain

NaturalNews
Thursday, March 22, 2012
By: Ethan A. Huff

[NaturalNews] Though typically referred to as a single condition characterized by chronic joint pain, arthritis is actually a collective grouping of more than 100 different diseases involving joint inflammation for which many conventional doctors simply prescribe pain drugs as a one-size-fits-all solution. But rather than resort to a lifetime of taking chemical toxins that fail to address the root causes of arthritis, why not try some natural, herbal alternatives that have been proven to provide lasting benefits without causing negative side effects?

Whether you or someone you know suffers from osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or gout, there are many herbal remedies known to treat arthritis-causing inflammation and pain symptoms. And many of these remedies do more than just treat the systems, as they systemically enhance the body’s ability to heal joint tissue and protect it from further damage.

Lemon verbena extract and omega-3 fish oil

In 2011, researchers from Spain published a study in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (JACM) revealing how lemon verbena extract combined with omega-3 fish oil is a powerful weapon in defeating chronic joint pain. After just nine weeks of treatment, patients taking this combination experienced as much as a 78 percent reduction in their pain symptoms, based on trusted scientific assessments of pain (http://cms.herbalgram.org/herbclip/444/011264-444.html).

“The nutritional supplement containing standardized lemon verbena extract (14 percent verbascoside, w/w) and fish oil omega-3 fatty acid reduced symptoms of pain and stiffness significantly, and improved physical function as shown by WOMAC (Western Ontario McMaster) and Lequesne’s scores after nine weeks of treatment,” wrote the authors (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22087615).

Organic sulfur

Organic sulfur, the precursor of chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine sulfate, two sulfur-based amino acids commonly found in arthritis supplements, is crucial to maintaining bone and joint health. And yet this important nutrient has largely disappeared from the modern food supply due to the advent of chemical-based fertilizers used in industrial agriculture, which have depleted bioavailable sulfur from soils and disrupted the natural sulfur cycle (http://www.naturalnews.com/026797_sulfur_organic.html).

This is why any attempt to quell arthritis pain must include supplementation with bioavailable, organic sulfur crystals, also known as methylsulfonylmethane (MSM), derived from natural plant sources. Many mainstream MSM formulas contain processed sulfur that is largely ineffective, so be sure to look for pure, organic sulfur crystals in “flake” form rather than in powder or capsule form (http://www.organicsulfur-msm.ca/cellular_matrix_study.html).

Nettle leaf

Nettle leaf, also known as “stinging nettles,” is an herb that has long been used in traditional medicine to reduce inflammation. Rich in natural boron, silicon, and other minerals, nettle has been shown in a number of studies to effectively treat all forms of arthritis, as well as tendinitis and bursitis. Nettle leaf can also be made into a topical cream useful in relieving arthritis symptoms externally (http://www.globalhealingcenter.com/benefits-of/nettles-leaf).

“[A]ll except one respondent were sure that nettles had been very helpful (in treating joint pain) and several considered themselves cured,” wrote authors in a 1999 study out ofPlymouth Postgraduate Medical Schoolin the U.K. concerning nettle leaf.

Source: NaturalNews.com

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How do I grow my own herbs indoors?

NaturalNews
Tuesday, February 28, 2012
By: Tara Green

[NaturalNews] Growing your own herbs can add a new dimension to your cooking and give you the opportunity to save money by making your own herbal teas, tinctures and salves. Some people think herb gardening is an option only available to those who have access to a plot of land, but this is not true. Even if you live in an apartment or condo with no outdoor space, you can still grow your own herbs.

Choosing the right plants

First, think about your apartment or condo’s gardening potential. The ideal situation for an indoor garden is to have windows which face south with no obstructions so your plants can bask in several hours of sunlight. If most of your windows face north or are hemmed in by other buildings, you can choose plants which require little sunshine, or you can purchase a grow light and timer. Consider the placement of heat sources in relation to your plants — indoors plants are unlikely to be effected by overnight chills but too much heat can be bad for them.

Also take your own habits into account — are you frequently away from home or are you able to tend your plants on a daily basis? Indoor plants obviously do not receive rainfall, so you may need to choose very low maintenance plants if you travel regularly. If you have pets that would interfere with plants, you may also want to think about where you can place the plants so your animals cannot reach them.

Unless you are an experienced gardener, it is best to start your indoor herb garden by selecting herbs which grow easily. Chives are a good option for those living in cooler climates or people who do not have windows with abundant sunshine. Parsley also has low sun requirements but grows more slowly so you will not be able to harvest it as quickly as chives. Bay trees are also relatively easy to grow, but like parsley, they require more of a time investment. This plant is also susceptible to scales if it becomes too dry so you will want to be sure to attend its water needs carefully.

Oregano, rosemary and thyme also grow relatively easily and can be good starter plants for novice herb gardeners. Consider, however, that these herbs are all used in Mediterranean cooking which means they grow naturally in sunny climates. If you choose to grow these plants, they will need abundant light.

Caring for your plants

Once you decide what herbs to grow purchase your seeds and other materials. When buying seeds, always check the expiration date on the package. Plant more seeds than you need, since it is likely only some of them will sprout.

Although a few plants, such as lemongrass stalks, grow in water, most require soil. You will most likely want to buy some potting soil for your indoor herb garden and natural fertilizer for your plants. You will also need containers — these need not be expensive, but you will want to take considerations such as drainage into account. Terra cotta planters can absorb water and cause plants to become overly dry so you will want to use these only with plants with low moisture requirements. If you are re-potting a plant which grew outdoors rather than starting from seed, select a container a few inches larger than the plant’s root ball.

Many plants require more humidity than indoor air naturally provides. You may want to place several plant containers on a tray which you cover with pebbles or marbles and water, being sure to keep the water low enough to prevent root rot. As the water evaporates, it provides moisture to the plant’s leaves. Replenish the water regularly to feed your plants needed humidity. To protect your indoor plants from pests, fill a spray bottle with soapy water and spray the entire plant, including the undersides of the leaves. When you are ready to harvest your herb plant, take no more than half if you want it to continue to grow and produce more for you.

Source: NaturalNews.com

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