Posts Tagged Prepping

The Most Often Forgotten Survival Preparations

via: Alt-Market
by: Brandon Smith
July 31, 2012

I think it’s safe to say with some conviction that in the year of 2012 the concept of survival prepping is NOT an alien one to most Americans.  When National Geographic decides there is a viable market for a prepper TV show (no matter how misrepresentative of true preppers it may be), when Walmart starts stocking shelves with long term emergency food storage kits, when survivalism in general becomes one of the few growing business markets in the midst of an otherwise disintegrating economy; you know that the methodology has gone “mainstream”.  There is a noticeable and expanding concern amongst Americans that we are, indeed, on the verge of something new and unfortunate.

Is it the big bad hoodoo of the soon to expire Mayan Calendar?  For a few, maybe, but for the majority of us, no.  That jazz is a carnival sideshow designed to make the prepping culture appear ridiculous.  We don’t need to believe in magical prophecies to know that there is a catastrophic road ahead; all we have to do is look at the stark realities of our current circumstances.  It does not take much awareness anymore to notice looming fiscal volatility, social unrest, the potential for unrestrained war, and the totalitarian boldness of our government.  I’ll take the wrath of Quetzalcoatl any day over the manure storm that is approaching us currently.

With some estimating a count of 3 million prepper families and growing in the U.S., the motto of “beans, bullets, and band-aids” is finding a home amongst legions.  However, being closely involved in the survivalist movement during the past six years and speaking with literally thousands of preppers, it has become clear to me that we still have a long journey ahead of us before we can claim true efficiency and mastery.

Continue Reading At: Alt-Market.com

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Survival Basics: Preparing for a Grid Down Power Outage

via: ActivistPost
by: Gaye Levy
July 26, 2012

Recent storms in my own area reminded me that power outages resulting in a grid down can happen anytime, to anybody, anywhere. Some outages are planned, some are the result of mother nature kicking up a storm, and some are the unexpected result of a natural or man-made crisis. Whatever the reason, there are various measures you should take now to insure your comfort and safety when the power blows.

Some of the basic items you need to have on hand to get through a power outage are quite simple and are things you probably have on hand:

  • Flashlights
  • Batteries
  • Candles
  • Matches
  • Blankets

This is a very short list, relatively speaking and unless you have been living in a cocoon in Siberia, chances are that these items have already been set aside so that they will be readily available when the lights blink off. And for a three or four hour outage, you will be just fine with these items.

But what if the power is lost for a longer period of time – for whatever reason – how will you cook your food? How will you keep warm? How will you insure your safety in dark? These are just a few of the issues you will face if there is an extended power outage. Add infants, the elderly or the infirm to the mix and you have a big problem on your hands.

Continue Reading At: ActivistPost.com

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Hyper Report 07/25/12 – Market Rigging by Central Banks

via: HyperReport
July 25, 2012

Source Links and video text for Today’s Items are located at:

http://hyperreport.org/2012/07/25/120725/

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Off-Grid Refrigeration

via: Alt-Market
by: John Chatham
Sunday, 22 July 2012

One of the hardest things to go without when going off grid is refrigeration. Most other operations can be replaced by manual means but keeping food cold or frozen in hot weather is a unique need in modern times. In times past the need for refrigeration was limited because most food was prepared fresh every day and very little was kept for several days due in part to the lack of mechanical cooling. The fast paced lifestyle many now live have led people to depend on frozen or refrigerated food due to the modern day work habits leaving little time for home preparation of food. In times past most women worked in the home all day, so daily preparation of food was a natural occurance. With most women working outside of the home nowadays, the fast preparation of food dominates most kitchens. Even for those that do a lot of cooking from scratch everyday, the use of frozen foods is very convenient.

The ability to raise your own meat, butcher it, and save it for later use on a moments notice has been nothing less than revolutionary in the kitchen. While freezing is not the only way to save foods, it is much easier than other methods for many foods. The biggest problem with frozen foods is the need to keep it frozen at all times. When the power goes out many people lose the contents of their freezers because of lack of electricity. Even after this happens several times most people continue to use the same means to keep their food refrigerated and never give thought to using a different method that would save them that loss and provide them with frozen food and ice no matter how long the power was off.

The use of propane refrigeration is a step above compressor driven units for several reasons. Many absorption refrigeration units can run on 12v, 120v and propane power. A refrigerator that can run on all three, such as the units found in RVs or camper trailers, can give you an edge when the power goes out. You could run it on 120v for normal operations and if the power fails you can switch over to 12v battery power or to a propane tank outside your home. Absorption units are powered by heat so as long as you have a heat source they will continue to cool. Another great thing about these units is the fact that unlike compressor units that have many moving parts that can break or wear out, an absorption unit has no moving parts in the cooling unit.

Continue Reading At: Alt-Market.com

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Survival Basics: Water Storage, Sourcing, and Purification

via: ActivistPost
by: George Ure and Gaye Levy
Sunday, July 22, 2012

Clean water is something that we all take for granted. We turn on the faucet and there it is. It is plentiful, it is clean and it is drinkable. Yes, it may have some undesirable chemical additions (fluoride come to mind) but that is a subject for another day. So, if a disaster occurred and the supply lines to fresh water were comprised, we would be in a pickle. There is a possibility that safe water would not be available for days and possibly not for weeks.

For this reason, the American Red Cross, FEMA, and just about every other authority out there recommends that the public store at least one gallon of water per person, per day for a minimum of three days. But if you think that a three day water supply is adequate, think again.

A more reasonable recommendation is that you up the recommended amount of stored water to a two-week supply. So for two people that would be 2 people x 1 gallon x 14 days = 28 gallons. This amount should cover your minimal needs for drinking, food preparation and nominal – and I mean nominal – hygiene.

Water Storage

Storing water for an emergency can be as simple as filling thoroughly washed plastic or glass containers with tap water and sealing them tightly. This is something that anyone can do without incurring a cost so long as few simple rules are followed.

Continue Reading At: ActivistPost.com

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Buying local grows independent, sustainable communities and pulls the plug on THE SYSTEM

via: NaturalNews
Friday, July 20, 2012
By: JB Bardot

[NaturalNews] In the midst of an economy that’s turning upside down, many people feel the loss of control and sovereignty in their communities and their lives. Many are concerned about where they can buy healthy food and other supplies and services without being pressured by large corporations whose interests differ from those of the individual. Others are worried about jobs disappearing, finances shrinking and a loss of human-to-human connections in the face of multinational indifference.

Buying local from independent businesses and with group purchasing power means providing local business support to neighborhood suppliers and using local resources to promote independent, sustainable communities. Buying local helps individuals become more self-sufficient and less dependent on large corporations.

Snubbing the system

Buying green and organic is important for broad range, long-term sustainability; furthermore, buying from local, independent business owners gives you a vested interest in your community. Here are 11 great reasons to keep your money and your focus on your neighborhood to rejuvenate life in the community.

1. Reduce your carbon footprint. A simple concept and one that allows you to travel less, spend less time on the road away from family, and spend less money on carbon fuels that create pollution and traffic congestion.

2. Stimulate the local economy. Buying local helps create jobs for those living next door to you and may even help create work for you. Local business support for independent businesses keeps money in the community and creates a domino effect that helps grow other local businesses.

3. Build local relationships. Buying local and using the power of group purchasing encourages the people involved to get to know one another and build relationships fostered on trust and friendship.

4. Establish local barter system. Buying local allows people to develop trust in one another because they get to know each other, leading to alternative ways of doing business — such as setting up a barter system. Individuals and businesses are valued for their services and products and no money is necessary.

5. Benefit local non-profits and charities. When local businesses are supported by local buyers, the business owners are more inclined to donate to local charities, furthering the strength of the community.

6. Improved services. Buying local and supporting independent businesses fosters better service all around. When people know each other, they’re more inclined to care and treat one another with respect. Business owners listen more closely to what their customers want when they know who they’re dealing with.

7. Support community buying groups. Sustain the community by joining local marketing and other group efforts to invest in communities at home.

8. Buy fresher foods. Buying local allows you to buy what you need and shop whenever you like, taking home fresher foods made and grown on local farms and by local suppliers.

9. Keep taxes at home. Contributing to local communities allows tax money to be better utilized on necessary local projects, infusing prosperity into the community.

10. Create prosperity, personality and character in your community. Buying locally allows each community to develop uniquely in accordance with the needs of those living there. Satisfaction with your community increases property values and attracts like-minded neighbors for ongoing sustainability.

11. Increase personal satisfaction. Buying local makes you feel good inside. You meet new people, make friends, watch community members grow, prosper and create solutions that support a better way of life.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.uvm.edu/vtvegandberry/factsheets/buylocal.html
http://www.foodroutes.org/whycare1.jsp
http://arlenecocosprairiekitchen.areavoices.com
http://sustainableconnections.org/thinklocal/why/

Continue Reading At: NaturalNews.com

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