Posts Tagged beta-carotene

Super human strength created by superfoods and herbs

via: NaturalNews
Thursday, August 02, 2012
by: Jonathan Landsman

[NaturalNews] Imagine living life without (chronic) unwarranted fear and never having to experience degenerative disease. This is NOT just a silly idea – it’s reality for many people throughout the world. Epidemiological studies prove that the longest living (happy) people remain connected to the earth and thrive on whole, natural foods – filled with nutrients but low in calories.

Experience the life of your dreams! Eating spirulina, chlorella, goji berries, chaga mushrooms and ashwagandha can balance blood sugars, boost the immune system and help detoxify unwanted poisons from the body. Don’t miss the next NaturalNews Talk Hour for one of the most informative and inspirational (nutritional) programs of the year!

What’s the difference between spirulina and chlorella?

While both are considered “micro-algaes” – spirulina and chlorella are not the same. But, without getting too caught up in the details, both of these superfoods can out perform just about any other food on earth. When consumed on a daily basis – these foods have tremendous healing potential.

Spirulina is very high in vitamin B12, B-complex, iron, essential trace minerals, beta-carotene and gamma-linolenic acid. It is the richest source of natural antioxidants of any whole food and it has more concentrated vegetable nutrition than any other whole food.

Chlorella is a green single-celled micro algae that contains the highest concentrations of chlorophyll known (60 mg/serving). It has high levels of beta-carotene, vitamin B12, iron, RNA and DNA and protein. Chlorella is well-known for its ability to help remove heavy metals from the intestinal tract. Discover how these foods (plus many more) can help transform your life!

Continue Reading At: NaturalNews.com

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Monounsaturated fats are essential to unlock nutrients from vegetables

via: NaturaNews
Friday, July 06, 2012
By: John Phillip

[NaturalNews] Everybody knows that a diet filled with fresh, raw vegetables and greens are essential to vibrant health and prevention of chronic diseases, but few understand how the fats they consume along with these foods help to unlock the nutrient store provided by a healthy diet. At the ill-advised advice of many dieticians and medical professionals, people are encouraged to follow a low fat diet that includes fat-free salad dressings laden with added sugars for flavoring.

Researchers from Purdue University have published the result of a study in the journal Molecular Nutrition & Food Research that demonstrates how the type and quantity of salad dressing determines the bioavailability of fat soluble carotenoids (including lutein, lycopene, beta-carotene and zeaxanthin) in vegetables and fruits. Carotenoids are associated with reduced risk of several chronic and degenerative diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular disease and macular degeneration.

Monounsaturated fats including olive oil help maximize nutrient absorption in the body

To conduct the study, 29 people were fed salads dressed with butter as a saturated fat, canola oil as a monounsaturated fat and corn oil as a polyunsaturated fat. Each salad was served with three grams, eight grams or 20 grams of fat from dressing. The study team found that polyunsaturated fats (soybean oil) was highly dependent on the dose provided, as they found the more fat on the salad, the more carotenoids the subjects absorbed. The saturated fat butter was also dose-dependent, but to a lesser extent.

The lead study author, Dr. Mario Ferruzzi noted “If you want to utilize more from your fruits and vegetables, you have to pair them correctly with fat-based dressings.” The researchers found that monounsaturated fat sources including olive oil provided the same carotenoid absorption at three grams of fat as it did 20 grams, suggesting that this lipid source may be a good choice for those craving lower fat options but still wanting to optimize absorption of health-promoting carotenoids from fresh vegetables.

The study team concluded “Overall, pairing with fat matters. You can absorb significant amounts of carotenoids with saturated or polyunsaturated fats at low levels, but you would see more carotenoid absorption as you increase the amounts of those fats on a salad.” An even better alternative to using processed, commercially manufactured salad dressings would be to make your own simple dressing using cold-pressed extra virgin olive oil and vinegar mixed with a variety of fresh herbs to maximize nutrient bioavailability.

Sources for this article include:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mnfr.201100687
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/06/120619230234.htm
http://www.lef.org

Source: NaturalNews.com

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