Posts Tagged Cancer Risk

Scientists Draw Link Between Vitamin D and Breast Cancer, Reducing Risk by 24%

via: NaturalSociety
by: Elizabeth Renter
August 7, 2012

Scientists have found a promising link between vitamin D and breast cancer, with the vitamin shown to reduce breast cancer risk. However, they say their findings only apply to vitamin D in supplement form, according to Reuters.

Link Shown Between Vitamin D and Breast Cancer Risk Reduction

Researchers found that women who consumed vitamin D in a pill had a 24 percent lower risk of developing breast cancer. But those who got their vitamin D in their food didn’t see the same results. While they don’t say why they think this is, it could be because those using supplements are simply getting more of the vitamin on a daily basis.

The study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, looked at 3,101 breast cancer patients and 3,471 health women, analyzing their diet and supplementation habits. There was no link established between dietary vitamin D consumption (or calcium consumption) and breast cancer. The link was only obvious in women taking more than 400 IU (international units) of vitamin D every day.

The researchers say more work is needed to determine exactly how much vitamin D is needed and to determine how it works. However, we do know that breast tissue cells have receptors for vitamin D, “raising the possibility that the nutrient could help regulate the division and proliferation of these cells.” And while the researchers don’t draw a connection between vitamin D and breast cancer when the vitamin comes from food sources, including the vitamin in a diet for breast cancer patients via foods naturally rich in vitamin D in addition to supplementation will only boost prevention.

Interestingly, the research gives no attention to getting vitamin D from the sun. It’s estimated that the body of the average light-skinned person creates about 20,000 IU of vitamin D3 (the most concentrated form) after one 30-minute, total body exposure to the summer sun at noon. In a darker skin person, the amount of D3 produced is about 10,000 IU.

You don’t need to sunbathe for hours to accumulate vitamin D, but getting outside for some sunshine during the day will increase the body’s natural creation of vitamin D, providing a wealth of vitamin D health benefits that could even reduce your risk of cancer.

Additional Sources:

HSPH.Harvard.edu

Reuters

Read More At: NaturalSociety.com

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Easy, natural ways to reduce skin cancer risk

via: NaturalNews
Friday, July 20, 2012
By: PF Louis

[NaturalNews] “All skin cancer is the result of damage to skin cells,” says Lise Alschuler, ND, author of Five to Thrive: Your Cutting-Edge Cancer Prevention Plan.

Skin cell damage is caused by oxidative stress from free radicals, which manifests as sunburn. It’s the same process that causes metals to rust and apples to brown. Although oxidation cannot be completely avoided, oxidation must be minimized to avoid free radical damage.

Oxidative stress is both the cause and the consequence of disease. Contrary to what allopathic dermatologists recommend, a daily, moderate dose of sun without sunscreen is actually beneficial for the skin.

Bare skin exposed to direct sunshine boosts vitamin D3 production in your body, but it should be moderate. 20 minutes; three or four times a week during peak sunlight hours is sufficient for most vitamin D3 requirements. Then there are supplements that can be added as well.

Antioxidants are the key to reducing oxidative stress. Molecules with missing electrons are called oxidants; whose primary activity is replacing their missing electron by stealing an electron from another molecule. This, in turn, causes a molecular domino effect of oxidative stress that can lead to disease.

The magic of antioxidants is the well researched fact that they can donate an electron to an oxidant without in turn becoming a free radical. Antioxidants stop the cascading free radical effect and reduce free radical damage.

Minimizing free radical damage to skin cells can be boosted by the right diet. Eating lots of fresh, organic plant-based foods is the key. Plants thrive on sunlight while using their own flavonoids to protect them from excess oxidation. You can borrow those flavonoids by eating plants.

Other internal nutrients for your skin

A high quality multivitamin with the full spectrum of vitamin E (mixed tocopherols), mixed cartenoids and zinc would be helpful for maintaining healthy skin as well as, ironically, vitamin D3 supplements.

Good fats are important. Skin cells contain fats. Avoid processed trans-fatty oils and use cold pressed virgin olive or coconut oils for salads and cooking. Omega-3 fatty acids are critical for the full spectrum of health issues. Chia seeds, ground flax seeds, and uncontaminated fish oils are good sources of omega-3.

Continue Reading At: NaturalNews.com

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Cocoa from dark chocolate lowers risk from colon cancer

NaturalNews
Monday, February 06, 2012
By: John Phillip

[NaturalNews] Colon cancer is the third leading cause of cancer deaths annually, a statistic that remains constant despite increased awareness of the deadly disease. Researchers from the Science and Technology Institute of Food and Nutrition in Spain have published the result of a study in the journal Molecular Nutrition & Food Research detailing the potent anti-carcinogenic effect of the natural chocolate compound, cocoa. Scientists determined for the first time that regular consumption of cocoa negates the inflammatory effect of digestive oxidative stress that results in intestinal complaints and is a precursor to the genesis of colon cancer. Cocoa is now considered a superfood as it has been shown to improve blood lipids and help prevent cardiovascular disease in past research. The result of this current study demonstrates that a daily dose of the compound can help prevent colon cancer progression.

Researchers studied rats that had been fed a cocoa-rich diet consisting of twelve percent cocoa, as compared to a control group that received the same diet with the chocolate compound enrichment. Both groups were exposed to a chemical known to induce colon cancer. Animals such as mice and rats have been used for decades to conduct this type of research because they exhibit a similar line of carcinogenesis that is comparable to humans.

Cocoa polyphenols from dark chocolate significantly lower colon cancer risk

The study leader, Dr. Maria Angeles Martin Arribas noted “Being exposed to different poisons in the diet like toxins, mutagens and pro-carcinogens, the intestinal mucus is very susceptible to pathologies…foods like cocoa, which is rich in polyphenols, seems to play an important role in protecting against disease.” After a period of eight weeks, the scientists were able to confirm the protective effect of cocoa polyphenols in protecting against this insidious form of digestive cancer.

The study results showed a marked decrease in the number of pre-malignant neoplastic crypts in the lining of the colon in the cocoa-treated group as compared to the control animals. Further, the researchers found a rise in antioxidant defenses in the supplemented rats and a decrease in oxidative stress biomarkers that are known to be protective against chemical exposure and the prevention of colorectal cancer.

The team concluded that the protective effect of the bioactive compounds in cocoa stopped cell-signaling pathways that typically promote cell proliferation and lead to tumor development. The treated animals also exhibited a much higher degree of apoptosis, or normal programmed cell death of potentially cancerous tissues. It is important to note that milk chocolate is not a good source of cocoa due to its low concentration of the polyphenol and high sugar content, known to promote cancer. Choose a dark chocolate with a minimum 70 percent cocoa content to significantly lower the risk associated with colorectal cancer.

Source: NaturalNews.com

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