Posts Tagged Economy

QE Isn’t Dying, It’s Morphing

Via: NomiPrins.com
Nomi Prins
November 10, 2014

A funny thing happened on the way to the ‘end’ of the multi-trillion dollar bond buying program known as QE – the Fed chronicles. Aside from the shift to a globalization of QE via the European Central Bank (ECB) and Bank of Japan (BOJ) as I wrote about earlier, what lingers in the air of “post-taper” time is an absence of absence. For QE is not over. Instead, in the United States, the process has simply morphed from being predominantly executed by the Federal Reserve (Fed) to being executed by its major private bank members. Fed Chair, Janet Yellen, has failed to point this out in any of her speeches about the labor force, inflation, or inequality.

The financial system has failed and remains a threat to us all. Only cheap money and the artificial inflation of asset values can make it appear temporarily healthy. Yet, the Fed (and the Obama Administration) continue to perpetuate the illusion that making the cost of (printed) money zero by any means has had a positive effect on the population at large, when in fact, all that has occurred is a pass-the-debt-ponzi-scheme co-engineered by the Fed and big US bank beneficiaries. That debt, caught in the crossfires of this central-private bank arrangement, is still doing nothing for American citizens or the broader national or global economy.

The Fed is already the largest hedge fund in the world, with a book of $4.5 trillion of assets. These will plummet in value if rates rise.  Cue the banks that are gearing up their own (still small in comparison, but give them time) role in this big bamboozle. By doing so, they too are amassing additional risk with respect to interest rates rising, on top of all their other risk that counts on leveraging cheap money.

Only the naïve could possibly believe that the Fed and its key banks haven’t been in regular communication about this US Treasury security shell game.  Yet, aside from a few politicians, such as former Congressman Ron Paul, Congressman Sherrod Brown and Senators Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren, the notion that Fed policy has helped bankers, rather than other people, remains largely divorced from bi-partisan political discussion.

Adding more fuel to the central-private bank collusion fire, is the fact that the Fed is a paying client of the JPM Chase. The banking behemoth is bagging fees for holding and executing transactions on the $1.7 trillion New York Fed’s QE mortgage portfolio, as brilliantly exposed by Pam Martens and Russ Martens.
Continue Reading At: NomiPrins.com

, , ,

Leave a comment

Econimic Swindles – Overheard In Every Boardroom In America

via: ZeroHedge
November 8, 2014

Could it really be this simple?

https://i0.wp.com/www.zerohedge.com/sites/default/files/images/user3303/imageroot/2014/11/20141107_seriously.jpg

, , ,

Leave a comment

Weekend Reading Suggestions – November 7, 2014

TheRedPillGuide
November 7, 2014

“I find television very educating. Every time somebody turns on the set, I go into the other room and read a book.”
– Groucho Marx

Earlier this week additional evidence was shared via NaturalSociety.com as to why Kellogg’s Cereals should become part of your complete breakfast be avoided like the plague.

Not only are Kellogg’s cereals subject to antibiotics, but to complete its devilish one-two punch they are also laden with GMO pesticides:

Kellogg’s Cereals: Double Dose of GMO Pesticides & Antibiotics

Continuing with the topic of health, Jon Rappoport covers in this link below on how the comptrollers are kicking in clawing in their attempts to carve out a new scamdemic reality for us:

The Invention Of “Virus Reality”

In the economic realm, Jeff Nielson pens this piece below outlining how the real price of Gold would operate without the chains it maintains from the criminal banking financial complex:

Pricing Gold In The Real World

Also within the precious metals arena, The Doc & Eric Dubin discuss the metals markets with Mr. Ferguson in respect to the US Mint being caught with their pants down having no silver for distribution from the US Mint:

US Mint Caught Totally Off Guard By EPIC Wave Of Silver Demand – Physical Market Screams No Mas!

Onto the environment, we have two seemingly separate but interconnected issues that will increase their detrimental momentum against the populace heading into the upcoming years.

First of these is the fact that there has been an extreme drought in the entire Southwest region of the United States that continues unabated.  Needless to say, the economic/political/societal ramifications of this drought could prompt innumerable issues:

NASA Warns California Drought Could Threaten US Food Supply “There Will Definitely Be Changes”

In tandem with the above drought, rarely discussed by the mainstream media are the ongoing issues of the Fukushima prefecture.  As radiation continues to spew into the northern hemisphere and circling the globe, this issue is only going to exacerbate given the absolute lack of coverage/action it is prompting.  Fukushima radiation is already affecting babies in the west coast.  As time continues, where will this tidal wave stop?:

Radiation Crimes Of Eternity

Now for the MacGyvers out there, below follows a rather creative and useful link for those searching for ways to add to their winter firemaking repertoire:

How To Make Firewood & Woodstove Logs For Free

Hope you all have a great weekend and remember, you only take each step once, so make sure each step is taken in the right direction.

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

Quote Of The Day

TheRedPillGuide
November 6, 2014

FranklinDRooseveltQuote-FinancialElement

, , , ,

Leave a comment

Silver Update 10/29/14 – Quantitative Fleecing

via: BrotherJohnF
November 6, 2014

, , , ,

Leave a comment

Nomi Prins: Why The Financial & Political System Failed And Stability Matters

via: ZeroHedge
From: NomiPrins.com
By: Nomi Prins
October 28, 2014

too-big-to-fail

The recent spike in global political-financial volatility that was temporarily soothed by ECB covered bond buying reveals another crack in the six-year-old throw-money-at-the-banks strategies of politicians and central bankers. The premise of using banks as credit portals to transport public funds from the government to citizens is as inefficient as it is not happening. The power elite may exude belabored moans about slow growth and rising inequality in speeches and press releases, but they continue to find ways to provide liquidity, sustenance and comfort to financial institutions, not to populations.

The very fact – that without excessive artificial stimulation or the promise of it – more hell breaks loose – is one that government heads neither admit, nor appear to discuss. But the truth is that the global financial system has already failed. Big banks have been propped up, and their capital bases rejuvenated, by various means of external intervention, not their own business models.

Last week, the Federal Reserve released its latest 2015 stress test scenarios. They don’t even exceed the parameters of what actually took place during the 2008-2009-crisis period. This makes them, though statistically viable, completely irrelevant in an inevitable full-scale meltdown of greater magnitude. This Sunday, the ECB announced that 25 banks failed their tests, none of which were the biggest banks (that received the most help). These tests are the equivalent of SAT exams for which students provide the questions and answers, and a few get thrown under the bus for cheating to make it all look legit.

Regardless of the outcome of the next set of tests, it’s the very need for them that should be examined. If we had a more controllable, stable, accountable and transparent system (let alone one not in constant litigation and crime-committing mode) neither the pretense of well-thought-out stress tests making a difference in crisis preparation, nor the administering of them, would be necessary as a soothing tool. But we don’t. We have an unreformed (legally and morally) international banking system still laden with risk and losses, whose major players control more assets than ever before, with our help.

The biggest banks, and the US and European markets, are now floating on more than $7 trillion of Fed and ECB intervention with little to show for it on the ground and more to come. To put that into perspective – consider that the top 100 global hedge funds manage about $1.5 trillion in assets. The Fed’s book has ballooned to $4.5 trillion and the ECB’s book stands at $2.7 trillion – a figure ECB President, Mario Draghi considers too low. Thus, to sustain the illusion of international systemic health, the Fed and the ECB are each, as well as collectively, larger than the top 100 global hedge funds combined.

Providing ‘liquidity crack’ to the financial system has required heightened international government and central bank coordination to maintain an illusion of stability, but not true stability. The definition of instability is this epic support network. It is more dangerous than in past financial crises precisely because of its size and level of political backing.

During the Panic of 1907, President Teddy Roosevelt’s Treasury Secretary, Cortelyou announced the first US bank bailout in the country’s history. Though not a member of the government, financier J.P. Morgan was chosen by Roosevelt to deploy $25 million from the Treasury. He and a team of associates decided which banks would live or die with this federal money and some private (or customers’) capital thrown in.

The Federal Reserve was established in 1913 to back the private banking system in advance from requiring future such government injections of capital. After World War I, a Laissez Faire policy toward finance and speculation, but not alcohol, marked the 1920s. before the financial system crumbled under the weight of its own recklessness again. So on October 24, 1929, the Big Six bankers convened at the Morgan Bank at noon (for 20 minutes) to form a plan to ‘save’ the ailing markets by injecting their own (well, their customer’s) capital.  It didn’t work. What transpired instead was the Great Depression.

After the Crash of 1929, markets rallied, and then lost 90% of their value. Liquidity froze. Credit for the masses was as unavailable, as was real money. The combined will of President FDR and the key bankers of the day worked to bolster people’s confidence in the system that had crushed them – by reforming it, by making the biggest banks smaller, by separating bet-taking arms from those in which people could store, and borrow money from, safely. Political and financial leaderships collaboratively ushered in the reform measures of the Glass-Steagall Act.  As I note in my most recent book, All the Presidents’ Bankers, this Act was not merely a piece of legislation passed in spirited bi-partisan fashion, but it was also a means to stabilize a system for participants at the top, middle and bottom of it. Stability itself was the political and financial goal.

Through World War II, the Cold War, and Vietnam, and until the dissolution of the gold standard, the financial system remained fairly stable, with banks handling their own risks, which were separate from the funds of citizens. No capital injections or bailouts were required until the mid-1970s Penn Central debacle. But with the bailout floodgates reopened, big banks launched a frenzied drive for Middle East petro-dollar profits to use as capital for a hot new area of speculation, Third World loans.

By the 1980s, the Latin American Debt crisis resulted, and with it, the magnitude of federally backed bank bailouts based on Washington alliances, ballooned. When the 1994 Mexican Peso Crisis hit, bank losses were ‘handled’ by President Clinton’s Treasury Secretary (and former Goldman Sachs co-CEO) Robert Rubin and his Asst. Treasury Secretary, Larry Summers via congressionally approved aid.

Afterwards, the repeal of the Glass Steagall Act, the mega-merging of financial players, the explosion of the derivatives market, and the rise of global ‘competition’ amongst government supported gambling firms, lead to increased speculative complexity and instability, and the recent and ongoing 2008 financial crisis.

Continue Reading At: ZeroHedge.com

, , , ,

Leave a comment

50 Percent Of American Workers Make Less Than $28,031 Dollars A Year

via: TheEconomicCollapseBlog
By: Michael Snyder
October 23, 2014

The Social Security Administration has just released wage statistics for 2013, and the numbers are startling.  Last year, 50 percent of all American workers made less than $28,031, and 39 percent of all American workers made less than $20,000.  If you worked a full-time job at $10 an hour all year long with two weeks off, you would make $20,000.  So the fact that 39 percent of all workers made less than that amount is rather telling.  This is more evidence of the declining quality of the jobs in this country.  In many homes in America today, both parents are working multiple jobs in a desperate attempt to make ends meet. Our paychecks are stagnant while the cost of living just continues to soar.  And the jobs that are being added to the economy pay a lot less than the jobs lost in the last recession.  In fact, it has been estimated that the jobs that have been created since the last recession pay an average of 23 percent less than the jobs that were lost.  We are witnessing the slow-motion destruction of the middle class, and very few of our leaders seem to care.

The “average” yearly wage in America last year was just $43,041.  But after accounting for inflation, that was actually worse than the year before

Continue Reading @ TheEconomicCollapseBlog.com

, , , ,

Leave a comment