Posts Tagged Poultry

FDA Approves Spraying Viruses on Meat Products

via: ActivistPost
June 30, 2012

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‘Science’ editor says he plans to publish controversial H5N1 avian flu study in defiance of government recommendations

NaturalNews
Friday, February 24, 2012
By: Ethan A. Huff

[NaturalNews] For the past few months, the journals Nature and Science have been deliberating with both the research community and the U.S. government about how to handle the publishing of sensitive information about a militarized strain of H5N1 avian flu. The U.S. National Security Advisory Board for Biotechnology (NSABB), a group of scientists and government security officials, had recommended that the journals redact certain portions of the research several months ago, but Dr. Bruce Alberts, editor of Science, now says, in essence, that he is tired of waiting for a solution, and plans to publish the full findings very soon.

It was widely reported last fall that Dr. Ron Fouchier and his colleagues from Erasmus Medical Centre in the Netherlands had successfully created a virulent strain of H5N1 capable of transmitting between mammals, including between humans. The research, which was submitted to both Nature and Science for publishing, includes critical details about how the deadly strain was created, which many say represents a serious bioterrorism threat if it ends up in the wrong hands (http://www.naturalnews.com/034228_bioterrorism_flu_strain.html).

But many scientists and media talking-heads are insisting that scientists need access to this information right away in order to begin developing vaccines for H5N1, a job they apparently cannot do if all the details about the research are not published immediately. Advocates claim that publishing the full details is no big deal because they have already been widely circulated at meetings, seminars, and conferences. But this argument actually confirms the opposite, as there is no need to publish the full research “for the sake of science” if such research has already been widely disseminated.

Militarized H5N1 avian flu strain could kill billions of people, suggest researchers

Meanwhile, the public, one-third or more of whom could be wiped out by this unthinkably pernicious virus, has not been given a voice in the matter about what to do with the findings. It is questionable enough that the U.S. government has been warning about mutant H5N1 for years, only now to have it conveniently appear in a lab as part of deliberate “research” — but now the recipe for making the human-transmissible strain could become widely available to the public (http://www.huffingtonpost.com).

“The people to catch H5N1 flu so far tended chickens or worked with poultry closely enough that they were constantly exposed to the virus,” writes Lynn Klotz in a recent Huffington Post piece. “By contrast, the so-called 1918 flu virus that killed millions in the United States and a total of 50 million around the world was incredibly contagious among humans. But it killed only about two percent of those infected.”

“Imagine a new virus that combined the lethality of the H5N1 flu with the contagiousness of the 1918 pandemic strain. That is the scenario we may now be facing.”

Source: NaturalNews.com

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Six steps to create your own organic permaculture garden

Via: NaturalNews
Wednesday, February 22, 2012
By: Tara Green

[NaturalNews] Organic gardening avoids the use of chemicals to make plants grow or protect them from insects, relying instead on natural gardening principles used for thousands of years. Permaculture organic gardening goes a step further and also emphasizes growing plants sustainably, working with rather than against the grain of the natural environment. Permaculture organic gardening is growing in popularity as more people realize that it offers an inexpensive and relatively low-maintenance way to grow their own fruits, vegetables, herbs and flowers.

Choosing a location

Observe your property at different times of day. Consider which areas receive the most sun, which are in shade for much of the day. Depending on where you live, if sunshine is a scarce commodity, you will want to expose plants to receive as much as possible. On the other hand, in desert regions, you will not want your plants to be in the area most likely to be parched by sun exposure. Also think protecting your garden from the paths where strong winds tend to blow through your property. Even a small property will have microclimates — notice these and plant accordingly to give different plants either more sun or more shade according to their preference.

Selecting plants

Avoid disease-prone plants which require time-consuming chores such as spraying and pruning by the gardener. Select plants which will thrive in your area rather than those which will require extra labor on your part to protect them from the environment. As far as possible, select plants which serve multiple purposes, such as fruit trees which will put forth blossoms in one season, fruit to pick in another, and provide shade for when you want to sit and enjoy your garden’s natural beauty. Native plants are also more likely to attract local pollinators such as bees, and to draw butterflies so that your garden contains even more natural beauty.

Making a home for your plants

Raised beds require less physical effort on the part of the gardener and also benefit plants, providing better air circulation, more protection from spring chills and improved usage of water. Raised beds also mean a small permaculture garden is an option even for apartment dwellers and others with little available space since you can rely on containers and vertical gardening principles.

Feeding your plants

One of the key concepts of permaculture organic gardening is to avoid waste. Having a garden gives you a means of re-using natural waste such as eggshells, apple cores, coffee grinds as well as yard waste which many people throw away. You can either purchase or make a compost bin to turn this organic material into gardening gold which can be used to help your plants grow.

Watering your plants

Modern gardeners who do not follow sustainability principles tend to draw heavily on piped-in water resources, often using hoses and sprinklers to make plants which require abundant water grow in a desert climate. Permaculture organic gardening tries to use natural water as much as possible, maximizing the use of groundwater and rainwater. Rain barrels allow you to collect rainfall and extend its use over longer periods of time.

Protecting plants from pests

Eschewing the use of chemicals does not have to mean a garden full of pests. You can use companion gardening principles, growing plants which deter pests near those which attract them. There is also a natural synergy between some plants which means planting them near each other increases your yield. Also, just as some herbs have a medicinal effect on human health, they also offer benefits to plants which grow near them. For more information about companion planting, visit http://www.appropedia.org/CCAT_companion_planting and http://www.gardeningknowhow.com

If you have space and live in an area where it is permissible to keep poultry, chickens can make a wonderful addition to a permaculture garden. If they are permitted free-range for most of the day, they will consume many pests. Chicken manure also contributes beneficial nitrogen to the soil of your garden.

Source: NaturalNews.com

 

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