Posts Tagged type-2 diabetes

A New Greek Name for Statin Toxicity: Polymyalgia Rheumatica

via: GreenMedInfo
by: Sayer Ji
August 7, 2012

New Research: Statins Increase Risk of Polymalgia Rheumatica 14-Fold

Few drugs are as toxic to the organ they are prescribed to “treat” as statins.  There are already hundreds of studies indicating that statin drugs are muscle-damaging (myotoxic) and nerve-damaging (neurotoxic), and yet they are somehow still legally allowed to be sold to millions of patients worldwide, ostensibly to protect the human heart —  which is, mind you, a muscle with an exceptionally high density of nerves.

After research published back in 2009 in the journal Cardiology found that statin drug use was associated with impaired heart muscle function, there is little doubt remaining that they do far more harm than good.  In fact, no less than 300 adverse health effects have been linked to this chemical class of drugs.

Some of the most consistently observed effects listed below

  • Liver Damage
  • Rhabdomyolysis
  • Coenzyme Q10 Deficiency
  • Type 2 Diabetes
  • Cataract
  • Pancreatitits
  • Cognitive Decline/Dysfunction
  • Erectile Dysfunction
  • Peripheral Neuropathies
  • Mitochondrial Dysfunction

Recently published research reveals another way in which the obvious damage caused by statin drugs is being covered up, whether by ignorance or intention. Statin drug-induced symptoms have been renamed in Greek as a newly minted, seemingly unrelated disease: Polymyalgia Rheumatica.

Polymyalgia translates from the Greek  “pain in many muscles,” and rheumatic means “flux.” Published in the journal PLoS, researchers analyzed the World Health Organization’s Global Individual Case Safety Database, and found that of the 327 cases of PMR reported, ” statins were more frequently reported as suspected agent (29.4%) compared to non-cases (2.9%).”

Continue Reading At: GreenMedInfo.com

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Eat strawberries, prevent diabetes?

via: NaturalNews
Thursday, July 19, 2012
by: Katie Brind Amour

[NaturalNews] Scientists at the University of Warwick have identified a potential preventive effect of strawberries on Type 2 Diabetes risk. Although strawberries have previously been identified as effective at battling high cholesterol and post-meal blood glucose levels, professor Paul Thornalley’s research has now demonstrated that strawberry extract actually stimulates the protein “Nrf2” in our bodies, which activates antioxidant activity and decreases blood lipids.

Eating strawberries or strawberry extract may offer a simple, natural solution to improving cardiovascular health. Now that researchers know how strawberries stimulate this protective effect, they can focus on determining how much and which form of strawberries will work best to fight cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

Eating fruit despite diabetes

Of course, a proper diet has always been the first line of defense in preventing diabetes naturally and – coupled with maintaining a healthy body weight – is the best natural treatment for achieving safe blood glucose levels. Many diabetics focus so much on carbohydrate counting and the avoidance of sugar that they virtually eliminate fruit from their diet. Unfortunately, this habit may prevent them from benefiting from the natural disease-fighting properties of some of nature’s most delicious foods (such as strawberries).

In fact, when incorporated carefully into the diabetic diet, eating a variety of fruits can be the key to maintaining energy levels, improving memory, fighting neurodegenerative illness, safeguarding cardiovascular health, achieving healthy skin and organs, and even preventing common diabetes complications.

So why the diabetic war on fruit?

Many diabetics believe that fruit sabotages blood glucose levels and eats up large portions of their carbohydrate budget for meals. Eaten in correct serving sizes and as part of an otherwise balanced diet; however, virtually any fruit can be a regular addition to the diabetic diet. In general, diabetic and non-diabetic diets should be composed of lean protein, low-fat dairy products, whole grains, lots of vegetables, and a variety of fruit.

Serve up some strawberries with Greek yogurt and walnuts for breakfast, snack on some grapes and whole grain crackers in the afternoon, or whip up a mango salsa to serve with fish at dinner. In general, the more variety, the better. Berries, bananas, apples, and citrus all boast wonderful health benefits, and can be easily monitored for portion size and identified on glycemic index charts. After a few weeks with strawberries and other fruits in the diet, things may start looking up as your diabetes risk and health woes go down – naturally!

Sources for this article include:

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk

http://www.healthline.com/health/type-2-diabetes/seven-day-meal-plan

http://ndep.nih.gov/media/nottoolate_tips-508.pdf?redirect=true

http://www.helpguide.org/life/healthy_diet_diabetes.htm

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22293281

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22191015

Read More At: NaturalNews.com

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Anti-diabetes drugs may cause diabetes

Natural News
Thursday, March 08, 2012
By: D Holt

[NaturalNews] Statin drugs are prescribed to lower cholesterol in the UK for obese patients, and also to those who have type-2 diabetes. But according to the Food and Drug Administration in the USA there is a risk of developing diabetes if you take statins — so much so that the FDA has demanded that warnings of the risk of the development of diabetes on put the labels of statin drugs distributed within the US. In the UK, however,there has been a reluctance to include a labelling policy as it would cause patients to be adverse to their treatment.

Do statin drugs cause diabetes?

The link is a ‘statistical’ one; there is an increased risk of being affected by the risk of diabetes if you take the medicine. However, the link between the medicine and the side effect is severe enough for the FDA to act, which is a factor that the UK government seems to disregard. Other cases of this disregard forthe research of othernations includes the banning of all except eight artificial food colors in the USA and other nations,whereas the UK still allows several of these banned colors to remain on the market.

Yet again, the medical establishment seems to think the way forward istreating acondition with a drug that has the side effect of causing the sameproblem it is treating. Diabetes is a serious disease that can be prevented with education about good nutrition and exercise; however, there is no profit in this and therefore we have to tolerate the pushing of drugs to control this affliction. The same can be said for depressionthat is treated with antipsychotic drugswhich can cause depression and carry a suicide risk. A simple way to avoid depression is good diet, meditation and an outlook on life that embraces celebration of achievements no matter how small, the treatment of problems as opportunities for improvement, and conflict as a means to communicate and build relationships.

Natural living is the answer

Diabetes, cancer, stress, depression, addiction and obesity are diseases of the modern Western world caused by a lifestyle of unnatural living bothin diet and approach. Whilst we harm the environment and each other in the pursuit of profit and material gain, we lose sight of the things that are important to us and our loved ones. Also, whilst wetread upon the earth we should understand the need for balance at all costsand the effect of disturbing this balance. If we eat an unhealthy fatty and sugary diet, we will harm ourselves and cause diabetes, obesity and otherillnessesrequiring expensive drugs that in turn mean more harm is done. On the other hand, a balanced lifestyle means we are much more statistically probable to notendure the issues and afflictionsconnected to the Western diet.

It is the way of the corporate world to suck us in bypromising great taste and a world akin to the cottage in the story of Hansel and Gretel. However, it is also “natural law” that there is cause and effect; to reduce need for thesedrugs, all adults must take responsibility for what they put in their mouths, even if it is only to reduce the profits of the greedy corporate machine.

Source: NaturalNews.com

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Low GI foods may improve eating habits for type-2 diabetes sufferers

Natural News
Sunday, March 04, 2012″
By: Michelle Bosmier

[NaturalNews] A new study carried out at Ohio State University and published in the journal Patient Education and Counseling shows that consuming a number of foods with low glycemic indexes (GI)each day can improve long-term dietary habits for type-2 diabetes patients.

The study was carried out on 35 type-2 diabetes sufferers aged 35 to 65. Lead study author and professor of human nutrition, Carla Miller, explained that setting simple goals can help anyone overcome unhealthy eating habits, regardless of their history.

Low GI foods regulate health

Consequently, participants in the study were asked to eat either 6 or 8 daily servings of low GI foods over aneight-week period, as such foods contain slow release carbohydrates and will not dramatically elevate blood sugar levels. To achieve this goal, participants tweaked their diets by replacing 500 calories worth of food with low-glycemic-index foods, including whole grains, legumes, nuts, seeds, fruits and vegetables. Foods are usually measured against a GI range with a maximal value of 100, and those that score in the lower half of the range (with a GI of 55 or less) are generally considered healthy.

Some high GI foods include refined sugars and high sugar fruits and vegetables like watermelon, dates, squash and pineapple; fruit juices, jams and jellies, and cooked potatoes.

Previous research conducted by Dr. Miller showed that when on a predominantly low GI diet, diabetes sufferers are able to shed extra weight, lower their BMI and decrease their waist circumference.

Type-2 diabetes patientscan benefit from progressive diet goals with low GI foods

The science team also noted that participants who were confident in their ability to reshape their dietary habits showed more commitment and had a better chance of success. “We ask people to set goals because they motivate action. Telling people to ‘go out and do your best’ is not effective. It’s not specific enough, or targeted enough, or timely. But in this context it’s not just a matter of setting a goal. It’s deciding what specifically you are going to modify to help you achieve a more healthful diet,” explained Dr. Carla Miller.

Since no guidelines pertaining to the consumption of low GI foods currently exist in the scientific community, many doctors fear that a diet regime based on low GI foods would be difficult for diabetes patients to follow. However, Dr. Miller is confident that her research comes to prove the opposite — that with the right education, people can learn to make the right dietary choices.

By the time the trial ended, Dr. Miller and her team discovered that many of the participants were in fact already consuming a multitude of low GI foods, even before entering the trial, as a means of fighting against diabetes. “We learned that we should set the goal for low-glycemic-index foods higher. We also learned that we need to set an individualized goal. We know that people can increase their consumption by almost two servings a day if that specific goal is set,” explained Miller.

The Ohio State study managed to surpass its original purpose in that it showed the importance of goal-setting in controlling eating impulses. Setting substitution goals (which means replacing an unhealthy food item with a healthier version that would target the same craving) can prove particularly helpful for people dealing with diabetes.

Source: NaturalNews.com

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