Posts Tagged Ulcerative Colitis

Using probiotic enriched foods can optimize your health

via: NaturalNews
Wednesday, July 11, 2012
By: Dr. David Jockers

(NaturalNews) Our ancestors’ utilized probiotic enriched foods on a regular basis. This was necessary as a means of food preservation without the advent of refrigeration. Many ancient medicine men and physicians began utilizing them to treat certain ailments. Probiotic enriched foods are one of the most important attributes of a healthy diet and lifestyle.

In the early 20th century, Nobel Prize winning scientist Ilya Ilyich Mechinikov attributed the remarkable health of a group of Bulgarian people to their daily consumption of probiotic enriched foods. He named the unique bacterial species that made up much of their fermented products Lactobacillus bulgaricus. He theorized that probiotic bacteria could have a much greater impact on human health than the much feared pathogenic strains of bacteria.

Every culture around the world had their own unique fermented foods. The Europeans used cabbage, beets and cucumbers to make foods like sauerkraut, kvass and pickles. The Koreans made a spiced, fermented cabbage they called kimchi. The Asians fermented soy to form products such as tempeh, miso and natto. They also created a fermented drink called Kombucha. Many different cultures also made their own fermented sourdough style breads.

Traditional fermented foods

Sauerkraut is made by fermenting cabbage often times in vinegar. Raw cabbage naturally has probiotics and enzymes that are exponentially multiplied during the fermentation period. Fresh (not canned) sauerkraut is a fantastic source of living enzymes and active lactobacillus and pediococcus strains of probiotics.

Kimchi is most commonly made with Chinese cabbages. There are many other variations of kimchi using cucumbers, eggplants, leeks, radishes, & other seasonal veggies. Often times these are prepared with a combination of fermented veggies that give it unique antioxidants, live enzymes and the special organism lactobacillus kimchi among others.

Fermented soy comes in three major forms: miso, tempeh and natto. Miso and tempeh often incorporate brown rice and barley fermentation with two unique probiotic yeast species. These yeasts enhance the bioavailability of the amino acids and produce high amounts of B vitamins. The bacillus subtilis bacterium is used to produce natto which is rich in proteolytic enzymes and vitamin K2.

Continue Reading At: NaturalNews.com

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10 reasons to take a probiotic daily

via: NaturalNews
Tuesday, July 10, 2012
by: PF Louis

[NaturalNews] Probiotic intake for overall good health has been underestimated by even the alternative health community. The fact is that gut bacteria greatly affects both overall physical and mental health.

There are 400 to 500 species of bacteria residing in your gut or gastrointestinal (GI) tract, which if opened up and laid out flat would cover a tennis court. If placed on a scale, your GI tract bacteria would weigh in at three pounds.

Probiotic bacteria have many more functions than digestion. They trigger immune system reactions throughout the body, including activating T-cells.

Good bacteria need to comprise 85 percent of the intestinal flora while allowing the remaining 15 percent to be pathogenic. Two-thirds or more of the immune system relies on this. (Source 1 below)

You can supplement probiotics with the best supplement online or from a health food store. This is critical if you’ve gone a round or two with antibiotics for whatever reason. But you have to know what to look for and how to avoid being deceived. (Source 2 below)

Another method of taking in probiotics is through fermented foods, such as sauerkraut, miso, kimchi, or any other fermented food you can purchase or make yourself. Milk kefir and water kefir are excellent sources of probiotics that can be consumed daily.

Making your own milk or water kefir is not difficult once you get the “starter grains,” which can be ordered online or procured from someone in a local Weston A Price Foundation chapter.

A list of YouTube video demos for milk kefirs is in source 3 below, while you can watch water kefir videos from source 4 below.

Ten reasons to consume probiotics

(1) Enhance immunity – a double-blind clinical test involving patients in intensive care proved that viable (alive) probiotics prevented multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), the number one cause of mortality among intensive care patients. (Source 5 below)

If probiotics can do this, what can they do to prevent chronic flues and colds and allergies?

(2) The immune protection of mother’s milk is enhanced if the mother takes probiotics during or before pregnancy. If breast feeding is impossible, then adding probiotics and prebiotics (what probiotic bacteria feed on) to a baby formula free from fluoridated water and sweeteners can be tried.

(3) Probiotics can reverse ulcers, irritable bowel syndrome, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, inflammatory bowel disease, and other gut inflammations that occur from a lack of sufficient probiotics.

(4) Celiac disease or gluten sensitivity (GS) symptoms are handled by adding probiotics.

(5) Processed foods and low fiber diets allow the pathogenic bacteria to overwhelm the good guys and diminish colon function. It’s important to add probiotics even if you drop the standard American diet (SAD).

(6) When pathogenic bacteria upset the 85/15 balance of probiotic to bad bacteria, yeast infections such as Candida flourish.

(7) A healthy gut flora balance helps prevent cancer by nourishing enzymes that inhibit tumor production throughout the body.

(8) Sufficient probiotic intestinal flora prevents radiation damage from X-rays and CT scans to the large and small intestines.

(9) GMOs are used in many processed foods and antibiotics are in lots of our non-organic meat and dairy products. They both destroy probiotic bacteria, making it necessary to add probiotic materials back if you’ve had any of those foods.

(10) Dr. Natasha Campbell-Mcbride discovered how to cure her son of autism through a diet that restored his probiotic levels and heal his inflammatory conditions. She developed GAPS, gut and psychology syndrome, confirming the connection with gut health and mental health. (Source 6 below)

Sources for this article include:

(1) http://www.drdavidwilliams.com/why-take-probiotics/

(2) http://ezinearticles.com

(3) http://www.google.com

(4) http://www.google.com

(5) http://www.ajcn.org

(6) http://gaps.me/?page_id=20

Source: NaturalNews.com

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Experts 30 years later – Intestinal fungi like Candida can contribute to disease

via: NaturalNews
Monday, June 25, 2012
By: Eric Hunter

[NaturalNews] Certain biologists and “alternative” practitioners have long been supporting the notion that intestinal fungi can contribute to disease. When we take antibiotics or eat a western diet, yeasts like Candida Albicans gets a chance to flourish in the intestinal tract. Healthy gut flora is vital in maintaining our immune system, and severe alterations lead to poor health and disease.

However, the general medical community has been downplaying the role of intestinal fungi. This is largely due to the fact that little research has been done; it’s difficult to diagnose and it can’t be treated properly with pharmaceuticals.

New research at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center looked at the connection between fungi and Ulcerative Colitis.

Dr. David M. Underhill and his team at the Inflammatory Bowel and Immunobiology Research Institute have been studying the interaction between Commensal Fungi and the C-Type Lectin Receptor, Dectin-1. In healthy animals Dectin-1 is produced and works as the body’s immune response against fungi.

The risk of developing Ulcerative Colitis increases significantly in mice with a defective form of Dectin-1. Dr. Underhill and his team treated these animals with an antifungal drug called Fluconazole and observed that their symptoms moderated.

In humans, a mutated form of Dectin-1 is closely related to Ulcerative Colitis that doesn’t respond to medical therapy. When this important receptor isn’t working properly our protection against intestinal fungi is decreased and we are more prone to develop Candidiasis.

It’s already known that gut flora in patients with UC differs significantly from healthy individuals. The fungal colonization of the colon may influence the activation of UC, and antifungal treatment causes clinical improvement in most individuals. Patients with Crohn’s disease and their healthy relatives are colonized with C. albicans more commonly than control families.

30 years after “The Missing Diagnosis” by Orian Truss and “The Yeast Connection” by William Crook were released, there’s growing research in the medical community on the importance of gut flora and intestinal fungi.

In a healthy individual yeasts like Candida are kept under “control” by beneficial flora and receptors like Dectin-1. Antibiotics and other drugs, sugar, grains, excessive hygiene and hereditary factors decrease our protection against intestinal fungi. Treating fungi with antifungal drugs is only a short-term solution since it doesn’t address the underlying problems. Prevention and treatment should focus on establishing healthy gut flora which in turn will protect against gut dysbiosis.

Source: NaturalNews.com

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