Posts Tagged Deflation

Econimic Swindles – Overheard In Every Boardroom In America

via: ZeroHedge
November 8, 2014

Could it really be this simple?

https://i0.wp.com/www.zerohedge.com/sites/default/files/images/user3303/imageroot/2014/11/20141107_seriously.jpg

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Silver: Supply and Demand

via: EDRSilver
July 24, 2012

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Hyper Report 07/25/12 – Market Rigging by Central Banks

via: HyperReport
July 25, 2012

Source Links and video text for Today’s Items are located at:

http://hyperreport.org/2012/07/25/120725/

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What’s So Bad About Deflation? Nothing, If You Own the Debt

via: OfTwoMinds
by: Charles Hugh Smith
July 20, 2012

Perhaps all the assumptions about inflation being good and deflation being bad miss the key question: cui bono (to whose benefit?)

One of the most widely accepted truisms of our time is that deflation is bad:bad for debtors, bad for the indebted government, and therefore bad for the economy.

What all this overlooks is how wonderful mild deflation is for those who owe no debt but who own the debt and the income streams that flow from debt. What the “deflation is bad” argument ignores is who controls the financial and political systems, and what set of conditions benefits them.

The entire Survival+ critique is based on one simple but revealing question: cui bono–to whose benefit?

The “deflation is bad” view naively assumes the Federal government wants inflation to lower its own debt burden. But since the machinery of governance is directed not at what’s good for the government, but at what’s good for the financial Elites that influence policy, then the only meaningful question is: what’s best for the financial Elites?

Mild inflation won’t bother the Elites much as long as their leveraged returns exceed inflation by a substantial measure, but deflation is much more lucrative: why mess around with potentially volatile inflation when deflation works better?

As knowledgeable correspondent James B. recently explained, the financial Elites’ are skimming their take regardless of inflation or deflation. (for more on this, see James B.’s commentary in Do the Parasitic Elite Pay Any Taxes? June 13, 2012.)

Continue Reading At: OfTwoMinds.com

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Natural food prices falling as big name distributors ramp up offerings

via: NaturalNews
Wednesday, July 11, 2012
By: Ben

[NaturalNews] It seems that more and more big name supermarkets have a natural foods section with natural food and products. Kroger in particular has pushed its Nature’s Market, now found in more than 1,300 of the 2,500 stores nationwide. With the demand to increase market share for natural foods between competitors, it could mean good news as prices fall slowly but surely.

“Used to be this was all very faddish,” said Gregg Proctor, who heads up natural foods for Kroger’s central division, which includes Indiana. “Not anymore. We’re adding new items constantly because if we don’t get it when it comes out, our competition will.”

According to the Nutrition Business Journal, natural food sales grew eight percent in 2010 compared to the less than one percent growth in the $630 billion total U.S. food market nationwide. It also grew, on average, by five percent every year from 2005 to 2009.

Kroger in Cincinnati has made a point to focus on natural foods, which makes sense considering it has seen sales double in the last four years in this area.

With those figures, it seems to be obvious there is a race to natural foods among the nation’s largest grocers. Many supermarkets are ramping up promotions and offerings, even launching their own brands of natural foods and products. The benefit to the consumer of not only selection and abundance, is price. The more these large supermarkets try to compete in this sector means falling prices.

“Make no mistake, there is a definite price differential,” said Meg Major, editor-in-chief of Progressive Grocer, a trade publication covering the industry. “But as that once small segment is growing bigger and bigger, it has not only raised awareness but affordability.”

“Our whole food culture is moving in a direction of less preservatives, less processed and just the whole ingredient count is so much more on people’s minds,” Major said.

The hurdle in this category: education. The difference between organic and natural can be a confusing one as natural foods are not regulated, unlike organic foods that are regulated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Organic foods are also produced with strict rules and guidelines, holding farmers and manufacturers accountable to abide by these regulations.

Not having any regulations leaves it up to the manufacturer to define the meaning of “natural foods.”

In the end, it is still up to consumers to educate themselves on labels and what they purchase at supermarkets. However, with demand in this sector increasing, it is nice to see large retailers offering healthy alternatives and striving to increase their selection.

Sources for this article include

http://www.usatoday.com/money/industries/food/story/2012-07-07/natural-organic-groceries/56085280/1?csp=hf

http://www.ota.com/organic/mt/food.html

http://www.digtriad.com/news/health/article/235554/8/Natural-Organic-Foods-Occupy-More-Grocery-Stores

Source: NaturalNews.com

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